1 v 1’s how my sessions have changed

1 v 1’s in football on the surface seem quite simple. In the past, I was definitely a Coach who didn’t think much beyond setting out small grids. One player at each end. Player with ball passes the ball to the other and we go live. You scored by getting past the defender and running the ball over the opposite end line of the grid.

Done. Top Coaching. Let’s go home so you can tell me how great I am to coach 1 v 1’s and not scream at my players to pass all the time.

Last week I read a blog by Dan Wright

http://www.coachdanwright.com/blog/2017/2/4/individual-possession

and it started me thinking about some of the changes I have made to how I coach 1 v 1’s. One that Dan mentions in his blog has now become pivotal to my 1 v 1 sessions. I will always include a passing option now for the reasons Dan mentioned and to give the player with the ball more practice at deciding the right time to take on a player. Lots of benefits also to the supporting players and other defenders.

Instead of listing all the changes I have made I will discuss the most interesting for me and how this change has had some terrific unexpected benefits.

Like I said originally, I would simply set out a number of grids and have the players in pairs going 1 v 1. After 30/60 seconds, I would stop it and one player from each pair would move to another grid and then start again.

Someone pointed out to me that players need to be explosive in 1 v 1’s to accelerate away from the defender and that nobody can be repeatedly be explosive without breaks. After a bit of trial and error I started to put two pairs on each grid but only one pair plays while the other rests. This had some good benefits because every time the ball left the grid one of the pair not playing passed a new ball on which meant we had a variety of starting positions for the defender and the attacker.

I patted myself on the back again and went back to thinking I really do know everything.

However, once I started to introduce a passing option into the sessions I started to have two or more players off the grid at the same end. This eventually meant players starting to chat to each other when resting. As a result, the sessions started to get sloppy as players often lost focus when not playing.

My next move was to get the players off the pitch at each end to watch the game and then coach the players playing at their end when the game was finished. To discuss with them if they thought the opposing attackers always tried the same move, tried to beat them on the same side, the defenders were always flat etc. This was more what I wanted as the players kept focus however it meant that players essentially got double breaks one when they watched the game and one when they discussed what had happened.

To eliminate the double breaks, I started having all players playing 2 v 2’s or 3 v 3’s at the same time but then when they rested they discussed among themselves as a team what they had noticed on their pitch. The key change here was after the discussion they played the same team again straight away.

Now this is where it got interesting for me. I have long preached for players to be creative or more unpredictable in 1 v 1 situations and not simply doing practiced moves. When the players discussed the opposition players in the breaks then played them again straight away it made all players begin to feel ‘they know what I am going to do’. This is turn made players feel they have to try something different.

I genuinely believe this has provoked players to be more creative than just about anything I have done before.

To really ramp up that feeling sometimes I have had the same teams play each other 3 or 4 times in a row. Often if they are going to play each other this many times I will swap one player over after 2 games and they tell their new teammates what they noticed about them and vice versa.

Of course, like everything some players love these discussions straight away and others need lots of time to discuss players they know like this but it is worth preserving with.

I feel by accident from simply wanting to give the players a physical break so that they can remain explosive in 1 v 1’s. I am now helping them socially plus providing a terrific platform for the players to think differently.

As ever love to hear your thoughts on how you have changed your 1 v 1 sessions over time.

Please follow me on Twitter @SeanDArcy66

Till next time

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Drills. Why not?

I can understand how some Coaches are amazed when I broach the topic that doing drills at training is not an effective way to improve our players. For a major part of my life I too believed that drills were essential to improving as a footballer.

Looking back I can see how I thought this way. Most training I did as a player was very much drills, drills, drills and a little game at the end if all went well.  I cannot remember any adult or Coach placing any particular importance on the game at the end either.

So how did I start thinking differently?

When I first started coaching the first thing that I noticed was that I disliked coaching drills almost as much as I disliked doing them when I was a player. I found them very boring and when players asked about when they were going to play a game I really sympathised with them.

Everything I read or heard about coaching at this point seemed to have two common themes we need to make sure the players get as many touches of the ball as possible and the players need to enjoy the sessions.

The perfect answer for me at the time seemed to be juggling the ball and learning moves with a ball. The players would get lots of touches and the majority of them seemed to really enjoy it. Plus I enjoyed this far more than coaching drills.

Next I got told about playing small sided games such as Line Football or 4 Goal Football and this seemed to meet the criteria as well plus it placated my lingering worries that the players were not passing the ball enough in my sessions.

There were two major turning points for me that I can look back and think that affected my thinking towards doing even more Games Based Training and gradually using less juggling or practicing moves in my sessions.

One was when I was involved in selecting a representative squad to compete at a National Championship. The trials started out with possibly 150+ players and when we had whittled this down to just 25-30 players I wrote out my opinion on each player and whether I thought they should be selected or not. I noticed that regularly I was assessing players as having a very high technical level but then not recommending they be picked.

It stayed in the back of my mind for months that how could a player get to have a high technical level but wasn’t really that good at playing football.

The second turning point came when I was coaching my daughter’s team. The team had an influx of about 4/5 players who had never played before. It became very apparent that they literally had ‘never played before’ and I had a lot of work to do to find a way to do sessions with these new players and the existing players.

I decided to do the majority of the training using small sided games so that I can improve their ‘game sense’ if nothing else while still keeping the better players happy. By the end of the season it was obvious that doing the training this way the new player’s technical level plus their ‘game sense’ had improved massively.

At this stage I was thinking more that Games Based Training worked because the players got lots of touches and enjoyed playing games. I thought as the players were enjoying themselves they simply learnt how to play football quicker.

Then I started to look into the theory behind Skill Acquisition and for the first time understood why Games Based Training actually worked. The amount of times the players touched the ball helped plus the players enjoying themselves helped enormously. However the essence of its success was that the players were practicing everything they needed to improve at football. They were practicing assessing the football situation, making a decision based on that assessment and then executing that decision all at the same time.

Now I totally understand how a player can have high technical ability but not be a good footballer.

If I look at my coaching career I think if I had enjoyed doing drills as a player or coaching drills as a Coach would I still be doing them. The answer is probably yes.

Also something for me to remember is that I never stopped doing drills because I realised they were inefficient so that isn’t something that I should expect other Coaches to realise either.

It took me many years of trial and error and plenty of research to realise that Games Based Training worked better so I shouldn’t expect Coaches to accept this within a few minutes of discussing the topic.

Please leave a comment or email me seanthecoach@icloud.com

Or possible leave a comment on Twitter @SeanDArcy66

Till next time

Even Better Decision Making in SSGs

I set myself a challenge of coming up with a different variation of Line Football after I wrote the blog ‘Decision Making in SSGs’ http://t.co/ZuhvnLXIz2  a few weeks ago. In particular I wanted to come up with a variation that solved some of the problems I mentioned in the previous blog while leaving all the good elements in place.

Pitch with End Zones

This is what I came up with. I changed the shape of the End Zone and made it resemble a penalty box at either end of a 30m x 20m pitch. The players scored by running the ball into the End Zone. I made the End Zone 7m x 6m so the players had the same amount of area (20m) to run over as when they had to run over the end line of the pitch (20m).

I have only used this once and it was with a good quality group of players. The topic was 1 v 1s specifically could you get past your immediate opponent. I added some conditions to force what I wanted

1 – The ball could not be passed across the End Zone. I did this to almost force a 1 v 1 when players were in the corners of the pitch.

2 – Nobody could run into the End Zone unless they had the ball. I did this to make it difficult for defenders to provide cover so encourage attackers to go 1 v 1 because often space behind the nearest defender.

I made the teams 3 or 4 –a-side because I felt the pitch may be a bit crowded with more players as the End Zone is taking away quite a bit of space.

My first progression was to introduce offside into the exercise. After that it just seemed to flow with the players getting lots of practice in a variety of 1 v 1 situations.

The session was filmed and the most obvious difference was that there seemed to be 1 v 1s happening more often all over the pitch. I think because the End Zones are only 16m apart in the middle the defenders felt they had to engage the player with the ball quickly.

Not allowing the players to pass the ball across the End Zones provoked lots of 1 v 1s in the corners. I didn’t particularly like the defenders having to go 1 v 1 near their own End Zone as they were easily shut down and so may next time allow defenders but not attackers to pass across the End Zone.

I thought the End Zone being on the pitch changed the type of 1 v 1 situations as well. Defenders had to defend against players cutting inside as well not just contend with stopping them going forwards. This meant there were 1 v 1 situations at a whole variety of angles.

I collected some data from the video. I had two games going side by side. One pitch was 3 v 3 and the other 4 v 3. The 3 v 3 group averaged just under six 1 v 1 situations every minute and the 4 v 3 just over six. The group actively played this exercise for approx. 14 minutes broken down into 3 periods of less than 5 mins.

In summary I would say I was pleased with it and would use it again without any major changes but I would love to hear the thoughts of other Coaches who have used this previously or have given it a go after reading this blog.

Thanks to all the Coaches who contact me and retweet my blog it is really appreciated.

Till next time