Reflections

kloppI am sure I am not the only one who has looked at old session plans and winced. I did the other day and I couldn’t believe what I was reading. There seemed to be no detail, the session objectives were really vague and sometimes the exercises themselves were designed in such a way that I don’t think the players were practicing what I thought they were practicing.

To give some background I work primarily with 9 – 13 year old players and normally coach in a technical program and not teams as such.

Now if I look at this logically as this isn’t the first time this has happened then I can expect to be looking back at my current plans in 2021 and wincing at how rubbish I am today. The trick for me is to try to see into the future by looking at the past with some of the core skills I coach.

So here is a rough guide to the evolution

1st Touch

10 years ago – Sessions were little more than the players having to control the ball a lot.

5 years ago – Emphasis on disguise and direction of 1st Touch, facing forwards on 1st Touch, using both feet however mostly 1st Touch into space. Very strong emphasis on planning 1st Touch before receive the ball. Encouraging players to use all parts of foot to control ball not just insides.

Currently – All of the above but more specific with direction of 1st Touch which can be towards defender to engage them as well away from defender to create space plus past nearest defender. More sessions were players have to control ball in the air.

2021 – I feel I am moving towards asking the players to think an extra step earlier. Not just plan the disguise or direction of their 1st Touch before the ball arrives but asking them to think can they reposition themselves before their 1st Touch.

Striking the Ball

10 years ago – Lots of shooting exercises and passing for passing sake. Coaching the correct ways to pass.

5 years ago – Shift towards allowing a player to strike the ball in more unorthodox ways and encouraging the use of the both feet constantly not just in specific use ‘other foot’ exercises. Beginnings of being more specific with types of passing such as inbetween passes, killer passes and switching point of attack.

Currently – All of above and again encouraging passes in the air not just on ground as with 1st Touch. With my current shift to playing small sided games from start to finish of session I no longer do sessions about shooting as all sessions require the players to score goals from start to finish. Feel sessions are more refined and the design of the conditions specifically encourages the players to play the passes I want not simply do lots of passing.

2021 – I think these sessions are going to head towards passing in match situations were the opposition are going to be asked to employ a tactic such as high press, low block or man for man.

Running with Ball

10 years ago – the most embarrassing sessions of all as seemed to involve little more than giving each player a ball and then playing TAG games so everyone was running with a ball at their feet. Plus working on specific turns to change direction.

5 years ago – Still very non-specific. Lots of sessions with areas that the ball must be run across but little detail. Players just encouraged to run with ball and keep it under control while turning or altering direction or speed. Vast amount of sessions simply about running with ball into space.

Currently – More specific with topics such as running with ball to engage defenders to create overloads & space for others, to move defenders out of position to create space, to allow team mates time to get into position or make runs as well as running with ball to attack free space. No turns coached at all as players playing games all the time so need to turn with ball constantly so whatever works for them is fine with me.

2021 – I need time to experiment but I think I can manipulate the dimensions of the area more with these sessions. For example I reread a session were I seemed to be very positive that the pitch being long and narrow was a major positive influence on the session but appear to have done little experimenting with the dimensions of the pitch since.

I think I will move towards more sessions on running with ball to move defenders and less towards attacking free space too.

1 v 1’s

10 years ago – Taught specific moves to beat players as all sessions about beating defender. Defender was almost always in front of the attacker. Players forced to go 1 v 1 often as no passing option given to players so little decision making except what move to use.

5 years ago – Shift towards the defender not always having to be directly in front of attacker and the attacker having a passing option so could decide to go 1 v 1 or pass. Focus on player going to both sides of defender and using both feet. Still a 1 v 1 session was always about going past a defender.

Currently – Strong encouragement for player to be unpredictable. Again more specific so now a 1 v 1 session can be about creating space for shot/pass or create space for a cross/ball behind defence as well as beating a defender. Always have a passing option in sessions now and more emphasis on decision making about right time not just constant encouragement to go for it.

2021 – I think this is going to be similar to 1st Touch in that more emphasis will go onto repositioning or readjusting body shape before 1 v 1 opportunity. How can a player make the 1 v 1 more likely to be successful before the opportunity arises without the player simply dropping off into a less threatening position.

I think I will still be looking back in 2021 and thinking I was getting away with murder with my plans but I have found this exercise very useful.

Merry Christmas in case this time next week I am rushing around the shops instead of writing a blog.

As always please leave a comment or email me seanthecoach@icloud.com

Or follow me on Twitter @SeanDArcy66

Till next time

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A few observations….

A while ago now I spent a pleasant three hours or so on a lovely day down at a park with my wife. From where I was I saw six footballs being kicked. Now this is why I am writing this blog. All I could see was footballs being kicked I never saw a game of football.

Six different families it seemed had brought a football to the park and predominantly the Dad was kicking the ball back to the son. The only game like activity was when a family of four showed up and the Dad was in goal and the Mum and Daughter played against the Son. This lasted about five mins until the Mum decided she had had enough.

One young boy who had basically worn his Dad out sat down on his football near another Dad who was kicking the ball back and forth with his two sons and watched them. It was clear if he had been asked he would have jumped at the chance to get involved but he was never asked and eventually they sat down too so he went back to his family.

All the children were roughly 8 to 13 years old so a decent game could easily have been played but there was not even a flicker of a chance of this happening.

I imagine those kids in the park that day could count on one hand the amount of times they have been involved in a spontaneous game of football.

I have actually heard children come back from holidays and say the best thing that happened was that, at whatever resort they were at, in the mornings all the kids got together and played football.

As a child I played lots of football and I also kicked a ball lots on my own. I did all the things I had read so many times about kicking a ball against a wall with your right foot and your left. I set up a line of old bricks in the back yard and dribbled in and out of them. I tied a ball up to the washing line in a shopping bag (the onion bag looked better but made your forehead go red) to practice headers. Just about everything I heard I gave it a go.

As a Coach now looking back at my own development I would say the word that stands out for me is balance. I did both playing football and kicking a ball on my own in almost equal measure. It is rare nowadays to find a player who has the same balance. I see lots of children who clearly spend lots of time kicking a ball but seem to have little idea on how to play the game itself.

I am sorry but I have forgotten who said this quote but I have never forgotten the quote

‘A friend to the ball but a stranger to the game’

This perfectly describes what I see most often.

I think a big hindrance to young players today is the myths that have grown around how the greats developed. How many times have we heard a great player talk about how they used to do something for hours on their own. I have no doubt they did but they also played lots of football which isn’t mentioned quite as often.

I suppose it isn’t mentioned as often because if a great player when probed to give the secret of their success says it is I played with my mates every day then surely someone will ask the difficult question about what happened to the rest of your mates. Why didn’t they make it as well? Therefore we get some obscure exercise that is given as the secret to making it.

An imbalance is created because people take this too literally. A sentence from an article or a 15 second sound bite from an interview is not the basis for a young player’s development. Spending time at training sessions trying to kick a ball through a hoop hanging from the crossbar one at a time because David Beckham did this is not going to be the answer.

For me enthusiastic young footballers today have more than enough opportunity to practice alone. The cost of good quality footballs now is low enough that having access to a ball is easy. The internet is so full of ideas that even the most unimaginative child can still find lots of different ways to kick a ball and have fun on their own.

The difference is it is far more difficult for that enthusiastic young footballer today to find ways to play lots of football. The old avenues for playing football informally don’t really exist anymore for a variety of reasons.

As a consequence, players who love football and have good mastery over the ball are not actually very good at playing football due to lack of practice.

By the way I do not believe that opposed or unopposed practice are the only two things that go in to developing footballers. There are many factors but from what I see in my grassroots environment we need to readdress the current imbalance and allow players to experience playing the game as much as possible at training so they can be friends with the game as well as the ball.

If they don’t play football at your sessions then where and when do they get the chance to experience playing football.

As usual would love to hear your opinion on the subject.

Look forward to hearing from you

Please leave a comment or email me seanthecoach@icloud.com

Follow me on Twitter @SeanDArcy66

Till next time

Confused Coaches

I was recently on a course that included a 4-day Strength & Conditioning component. The topic was raised about the language used by Sports Scientists. Almost every Coach agreed that they don’t want to hear a load of jargon about underloads, overloads or maximum aerobic speed they just want to know if the players are as fit as possible to play football.

As Coaches it was quite obvious we didn’t want someone coming into our football environment using language we are unfamiliar with and had any trouble understanding.

Recently I watched a training session were U8s were getting shouted at to take the ball on the half-turn constantly. Now this is language I am familiar with as I suppose is everyone reading this blog but would it be something I would expect an U8 to understand.

In the past when I have mentioned to Coaches that they might be using language that confuses younger players I inevitably end up in a debate not about using clearer language but how the kids should know the meaning of the phrases the Coach is using.

If we flip this and return to the Sports Scientists at the start of the blog. How long would a Sports Scientist be employed if they suggested to the Head Coach they weren’t going to change the language they are comfortable using but instead the Head Coach should learn to understand them.

A few seasons back I had a discussion about language used by Coaches at a meeting and both the Coaches in question were as usual saying the fault lay with the players. The players didn’t know what something meant because they don’t understand football these days like we did etc etc.

I have no idea where it came from but I said to the Coaches

‘Do you know what a ‘Sweaty Goal’ is.’

Both of them looked at me with pretty much the same expression I had when someone first spoke to me about half spaces.

‘Ask your players and I reckon every single one of them will know.’

I think one of the Coaches actually googled ‘Sweaty Goal’ right there and then and were amazed that they got an answer as they thought I was just making it up. I told them only a few weeks before with their players I did a game when a goal was worth double if it was a sweaty. It was great for working on players supporting the attack and positioning themselves to support the player on the ball.

The point is the information you give has to be understood before the players can actually use that information. If the players don’t understand then think of another way to phrase it that is clearer.

As usual would love to hear your opinion on the subject and whether you know what a ‘Sweaty Goal’ is.

Look forward to hearing from you

Please leave a comment or email me seanthecoach@icloud.com

Follow me on Twitter @SeanDArcy66

Till next time